Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts

Sounds Feelings Thoughts Translated and Introduced by Magnus J Krynski and Robert A Maguire Regarded as one of the best representatives since World War II of the rich and ancient art of poetry in Poland Wislawa Szymborska

  • Title: Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts
  • Author: Wisława Szymborska Magnus J. Kruyski
  • ISBN: 9780691013800
  • Page: 201
  • Format: Paperback
  • Translated and Introduced by Magnus J Krynski and Robert A Maguire Regarded as one of the best representatives since World War II of the rich and ancient art of poetry in Poland, Wislawa Szymborska 1923 2012 is, in the translators words, that rarest of phenomena a serious poet who commands a large audience in her native land The seventy poems in this bilingual ediTranslated and Introduced by Magnus J Krynski and Robert A Maguire Regarded as one of the best representatives since World War II of the rich and ancient art of poetry in Poland, Wislawa Szymborska 1923 2012 is, in the translators words, that rarest of phenomena a serious poet who commands a large audience in her native land The seventy poems in this bilingual edition are among the largest and most representative offering of her work in English, with particular emphasis on the period since 1967 They illustrate virtually all her major themes and most of her important techniques.Describing Szymborka s poetry, Magnus Krynski and Robert Maguire write that her verse is marked by high seriousness, delightful inventiveness, a prodigal imagination, and enormous technical skill She writes of the diversity, plenitude, and richness of the world, taking delight in observing and naming its phenomena She looks on with wonder, astonishment, and amusement, but almost never with despair.

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      201 Wisława Szymborska Magnus J. Kruyski
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      Published :2018-04-11T15:00:02+00:00

    One thought on “Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts

    1. Jim

      When the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1996 was awarded to Wislawa Szymborska, the selection committee for once did not screw the pooch. In Poland, poetry is very much alive; and Wislawa Szymborska is very much the poet of the people. Even in translation, the poems in Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts, are by turns delightful and profound. I read a library copy of this book, and now I find I must purchase my own copy -- this one is a keeper.In a poem about travel entitled "Travel Elegy", she writes:I w [...]

    2. Mon

      'within the four walls of avalanches, I call out to Yeti.Stomping my feet for warmthon the snowthe snow eternal.'

    3. Yasmine

      A beautiful selection of poems, with each poem both in the original Polish and the translated English. "Take it not amiss, O speech, that I borrow weighty words, / And later try hard to make them seem light." - from Under a Certain Little Star

    4. Rob McMonigal

      Can't really give this one the larger review I normally give poetry because it just didn't move me one way or the other. Ms. Szymborska, perhaps as a defense mechanism to avoid the wrath of the state, is simply one of those inoffensive poets that writes in a style I just can't get myself into, no matter how technically brilliant the poems.There are flashes of interest, here and there, such as "Family Album" which discusses the unromantic loves of most humans--"Romeos of consumption? Juliets of d [...]

    5. sarah louise

      Although I am sad this collection doesn't include "VOCABULARY" ("La Pologne? LA Pologne? Isn't it terribly cold there?"), this bilingual edition is beautiful. What astonishes me is that the sensitivity of Szymborska's writing and tone come through with very little smoke-and-mirror work by the (clearly talented) translators; you can see in the bilingual reflection that the grammatical structure of English and Polish allows for Szymborska's anaphora to create as much music as any rhyme or attentio [...]

    6. jeff

      I finally sat down and worked my way through this book, and was duly rewarded. In addition to the hallmark irony of post-war Polish writers, Szymborska injects a sense of true wonder and delight in the world, without denying the fact of the inherent frustrations and difficulties. As a bonus, the Polish versions of the poems are on the facing pages, so you can see how closely hewn (or not) the translations actually are. It is only when I get to see this that the reality of translating becomes tru [...]

    7. Mia

      A wonderful collection of poetry. Here is a poem from the collection:Parable Some fishermen pulled a bottle from the deep. In it was a scrap of paper, on which were written the words: "someone, save me! Here I am. The ocean has cast me up on a desert island. I am standing on the shore waiting for help. Hurry. Here I am!" "There is not date. Surely it is too late by now. The bottle could have been floating in the sea a long time," said the first fisherman. "And the place is not indicated. We do n [...]

    8. Rise

      Szymborska is my favorite poet. Her style and Akhmatova's are comparable to some extent but I find Szymborska's poems to be less weighed down by her themes. I'm not too enamored by the translations in this collection but the power of the lines can't help but emanate from their playfulness and wit. Not that I understand Polish, but the versions in View With a Grain of Sand (translated by Stanisław Barańczak and Clare Cavanagh) sound better to me especially with the symmetric quality of the line [...]

    9. Tom Romig

      Another marvelous collection from this Nobel Prize poet. The thoughtful Translators' Introduction provides a fine overview of Ms. Szymborska's style, techniques, verbal and thematic inventiveness, subjects, and sense of irony, together with revealing comments about translating. The poems have been selected from the five volumes of her work published from 1957-1976, with emphasis on the three published from 1967-1976. The original Polish versions and their English translations are on facing pages [...]

    10. Scott Cox

      Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska won the 1996 Nobel Prize for literature. She is one of my favorite poets (along with T.S. Eliot and Emily Dickinson). The following lines from her poem, "The Museum" are some of my favorite: "The crown has outlasted the head. The hand has lost out to the glove. The right shoe has won out over the foot. As for me, I'm alive, please believe me. The race with my dress is still on. You can't imagine my rival's will to win! And how much it would like to outlast me!"

    11. Cameron

      Szymborska's poems are technically proficient, witty and lyrical. But often I found her sentences strained and impersonal. Perhaps my most damning criticism of Syzmborska's output as represented in this collection is that her poetry is too polite. One can only wonder what she would've produced had she not been lived during the era of socialist censorship in Poland.

    12. Christina

      In my opinion, an inferior translation, as compared to the luminosity of Baranczak/Cavanaugh's. This volume does, however, place the translations side-by-side with the original Polish text, which is handy for comparison.

    13. Denae DiVincenzo

      Best translations of her work I have ever encountered, and conveniently coupled with English versions (which is difficult to find). I am continuously reading from this.

    14. shawn

      a wonderfully evocative poet. keeping in mind the fact that i am generally uninterested in poetry and notoriously hard to please where poetry is concerned, i was deeply impressed by these poems.

    15. Janalee

      Amazing, beautiful, moving shall I go on. I LOVED this book of poetry. So many of the poems struck a chord with me. My favorites: But for the Grace and Autotomy.

    16. Brian

      Szymborska is so incredibly gifted as a writer. Here is a link to my favorite poem of hers: nobelprize/nobel_prize

    17. Hoyadaisy

      I love Szymborska, but I guess I love her later collections more. "View with a Grain of Sand" includes the best from the early works included here (e.g "The Terrorist").

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