The Fox Boy: The Story of an Abducted Child

The Fox Boy The Story of an Abducted Child A gripping narrative that sweeps the reader along as it seeks to uncover a mystery from the pages of New Zealand s troubled racial past While doing some preliminary research for a travel book Peter W

  • Title: The Fox Boy: The Story of an Abducted Child
  • Author: Peter Walker
  • ISBN: 9781582342191
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A gripping narrative that sweeps the reader along as it seeks to uncover a mystery from the pages of New Zealand s troubled racial past.While doing some preliminary research for a travel book, Peter Walker came across a photograph taken in the mid nineteenth century that haunted him A Maori boy, at age five or six, is dressed up as a proper English gentleman, one hand hidA gripping narrative that sweeps the reader along as it seeks to uncover a mystery from the pages of New Zealand s troubled racial past.While doing some preliminary research for a travel book, Peter Walker came across a photograph taken in the mid nineteenth century that haunted him A Maori boy, at age five or six, is dressed up as a proper English gentleman, one hand hidden in the pocket of his trousers, the other placed squarely on what looks like a bible How did such a young member of the native population of New Zealand wind up in such a place, why did he look so unhappy, and what happened next With picture in hand and numerous questions in mind, Peter set off on his quest to solve the riddle of Ngatau Omahuru or little William Fox It was soon revealed that this little boy, about whom perhaps ten lines had ever been published in history books, was kidnapped during a battle and later adopted by the Prime Minister himself to be trained as lawyer As Walker uncovers and information following the boy s footsteps out of the forest and into the high society drawing rooms of Wellington and London it becomes clear that little William Fox played a crucial role in New Zealand s violent interracial history.As Walker travels in pursuit of the facts he finds himself on a personal journey as well, revisiting the scenes of his own childhood and quite unexpectedly coming across information that connects him personally to the historical material he finds, making The Fox Boy both travel writing and narrative history at their finest.

    • Best Read [Peter Walker] ☆ The Fox Boy: The Story of an Abducted Child || [Psychology Book] PDF ☆
      308 Peter Walker
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Peter Walker] ☆ The Fox Boy: The Story of an Abducted Child || [Psychology Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Peter Walker
      Published :2018-04-07T03:11:55+00:00

    One thought on “The Fox Boy: The Story of an Abducted Child

    1. Miz

      As someone who studies NZ history and a lawyer, this should have been an excellent read for me. Unfortunately I struggled through the lyrical writing (which I found painful) and ramblings off-topic, and ended up skim reading it. I might pick it up again but I wasn't compelled enough to read itMaybe I like history textbooks too much!!

    2. Linda

      Although shocked by some of New Zealand early leaders. We cannot impose my 21st century moralities into this county's troubled formative years. I am tempted to explore more litature about the 1860 Maori wars, but it will not be by Peter Walker.I found his style of jumping around the country, years and people disconcerting. Although very familiar with NZ geography, this story would have been impossible for an outsider to follow. A better map may have solved the problem.

    3. Emma

      The story looked good from the blurb. But so slow and detail driven, made it too boring. Couldn't finish it. On a par with Sophie's World. Oh dear!!

    4. Diane Warrington

      This is a fascinating study of a piece of New Zealand history that is only just now in 2013 being reconciled. While I knew a lot about the history of Parihaka, I did not know much about the preceding years of conflict and war in the Taranaki and Whanganui area. The boy was abducted during the Battle of the Bird. He was about 7 or 8. Within 2 days he had his photo taken in Whanganui in Pakeha dress. Although he already had parents living, he was 'adopted' by Sir William Fox and taken to Wellingto [...]

    5. Patricia Hirsche

      Before I travel to a country I try to do some reading about it - fiction and non fiction. This is an incredible book. I feel I learned a wide range of things about NZ. The author did an immense amount of research and produced a highly readable, enthralling story that is history, but comes across as a drama.The subject of the book starts out to be the boy, and ends up to be the tragedy of what happened to the Maoris. I could hardly stand to read parts of the description of the treatment of the Ma [...]

    6. Rosemary

      This book was well-researched and exposed the manipulative behaviour of colonial settlers and politicians only interested in furthering their own cause, i.e. feathering their own nests. What stood out was the portrayal of the protagonist for peace, Te Whiti - a pre-Gandhi exponent of non-violent resistance. The author's telling of the story is compassionate. The book is not a fast read but there is a lot in it, well worth perservering with.

    7. Naomi

      This book was such a delightful education to me of my own region - it provided an alternate history than the one handed to me by my elders and teachers in school. I have since done quite a lot of research and Peter Walker's account seems to be fairly accurate (as accurate as you can get in this case). It was a wonderful starting point for my cultural awakening!

    8. Donna R

      This book moved me deeply. Having started out intrigued by Ngatau and his story Peter widens the scope considerably to encompass some torrid years of land acquisition in the Taranaki region of New Zealand. At times it was hard for me to read, yet I think Peter managed to include enough traces of humanity that I didn't wallow in the meanness of the times.

    9. Kelvin

      This was a fantastic historical book. It took me back to a time in New Zealand history that needs to be talked about more. My education is badly tainted by our colonial past, this book came as an educational breath of fresh air.

    10. Ian

      Through focusing on one person's life it paints a haunting picture of a New Zealand that seems like another world. I particularly enjoyed the passages describing a vanished Wellington that was the centre of politicking between Maori and Pakeha.

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