The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen

The Science of Good Cooking Master Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen In this radical new approach to home cooking we use science to explain what goes on in the kitchen Unlike other food science books we make a direct and practical connection between the science and t

  • Title: The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen
  • Author: Cook's Illustrated Magazine
  • ISBN: 9781933615981
  • Page: 306
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In this radical new approach to home cooking, we use science to explain what goes on in the kitchen Unlike other food science books, we make a direct and practical connection between the science and the cooking We divide the book into 50 core principles, support them through detailed yet friendly explanations, bring them alive with color illustrations and inventive experIn this radical new approach to home cooking, we use science to explain what goes on in the kitchen Unlike other food science books, we make a direct and practical connection between the science and the cooking We divide the book into 50 core principles, support them through detailed yet friendly explanations, bring them alive with color illustrations and inventive experiments, and reinforce them through recipes that put the principle to work At Cook s Illustrated, we ve been asking why in the kitchen for over 20 years and often find our answers in science We believe good science makes great food and that understanding basic science will make you a great cook.

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      Published :2018-04-14T12:48:10+00:00

    One thought on “The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen

    1. Suzanne

      A few years ago, I was flipping through an America's Test Kitchen magazine at my mother-in-law's house and saw a diagram showing ripening bananas and their relative sugar content. The riper the banana, the more sugar due to the starch breakdown -- that's one reason super-ripe bananas are better for desserts. I skimmed some of the recipes and they all had little lead-ins, explaining why they chose specific ingredients and techniques. They were like mini science papers about cooking! My background [...]

    2. Jennifer

      I do no know how to cook. I can bake because I can follow directions and set a timer, but cooking meat is terrifying for me. I don't know how many times that I have heard "You'll just know when it is done." If this cooking 6th sense inherited in some people? I definitely do not have it. Also, the color change technique doesn't work for me because slight variations of color make a big difference in how down something is. I just don't get it! The Science of Good Cooking (Cook's Illustrated Cookboo [...]

    3. Norrisjackie

      I feel weird writing a review for a cookbook, but SERIOUSLY. This book is a game-changer. I've enjoyed cooking and baking for years and can follow a recipe well enough, but when something didn't turn out I could never really troubleshoot what went wrong. This book will change that! I loved the layout - there are 50 concepts and they begin with explaining the science behind why this technique works versus others, etc. They explain the test kitchen experiments and give several insanely detailed re [...]

    4. Scott Ableman

      I have been reading Cook's Illustrated since the first issue in 1993. Following 20 years of this wonderful magazine is like an educational journey. I've observed from afar as the staff has explored and learned and even invented successful kitchen techniques, then dug more deeply to understand the "why" behind their successes and failures, often revisiting old formulas in search of improvement.A distinguishing and endearing signature of a Cook's Illustrated article is the unapologetic quest for s [...]

    5. Cyndi Beane-Henry

      I am a connoisseur of good food, and good cookbooks. I am of the opinion, one can never have too many good cookbooks!However, this one, this marvellous piece of cooking knowledge, I so wish I'd had those 30+ years ago when I first started out on my own! Do they still teach 'Home Ec' in high schools? [If so, this should be required curriculum!]Not only is this book filled with fabulous recipes, but the science that makes the recipe work! Yes, you read that right. the "science" behind the recipe t [...]

    6. Whitney Archibald

      At last! I have been looking for this cookbook for years.Things I love about this book:1. In-depth, scientific explanations at the beginning of each chapter/concept.2. More specific explanations after each recipe, with the rationale behind each step.3. Enough recipes for each concept to really help you master it.4. The recipes themselves have been delicious. (The turkey I prepared the night before Thanksgiving and then left in the fridge, uncovered, had the most amazing, crispy skin. My brother, [...]

    7. Shari Henry

      I decided I had to own this book when it became a hot item at an annual White Elephant gift exchange. Clearly, this was no White Elephant! My trade proposal went unbrokered, however, so I opted for the next best option - I checked Cook's Illustrated: The Science of Good Cooking out from the library. I felt a little sad that I couldn't earmark pages and highlight passages and write notes in margins. Imagine my delight when that very day I happened to walk past a pile of books being sold by the Fr [...]

    8. Andrea James

      From the starting of point of I think it's a wonderful book (I wish I had something like this 20 years ago when I started cooking), I'm going to point out a few things that I didn't enjoy as much about the book given that the other 5-star reviewers have heaped (much deserved) praise already.Sometimes the book feels too self-assured. This perhaps partly comes out of doing such rigorous testing (great!) but it can also come across patriarchal and "listen to me for I am Vader and can kill you with [...]

    9. Nicole

      My new favorite go-to source in the kitchen. Every recipe I've tried in here has been a success (granted, a very small sampling of what's available in the book). Does an excellent job of explaining the techniques so you can actually apply what you learned to other situations beyond the specific recipe.

    10. Jimmy

      Finally finished…and I'm a better chef for it.I've always loved cooking, but there's always been a part of me asking why does a particular recipe work when I add the secret ingredient? What's the science behind it? What's the reason I add salt to my meat, or flour before cooking. Just how long should I let something sit in a stew? Why? Why? Why? Finally, I decided to find out. By looking online? Of course not…being the voracious reader that I am, I opted to get a book about the science of co [...]

    11. Laura

      I was tempted to give this three (or even two) stars because:1. It's WAY too much information for the stated goal. These concepts are far too nitpicky to be able to "master" for cooking in the kitchen.2. This seems to be presented as a book for beginner cooks but if I didn't already know how to cook, I would have been totally overwhelmed by it.3. Most (probably all) of the recipes are just recycled from their magazine and other cookbooks so there wasn't much new for me because I've been an on an [...]

    12. Sharon

      Those who watch America's Test Kitchen on PBS are familiar with the brief scientific explanations that accompany each demonstration. This book amplifies those discussions.Unlike most cookbooks, which are broken out by type of dish (eggs, appetizers, what-have-you), "The Science of Good Cooking" is broken out by scientific principle. The first part of the chapter explains the principle in detail (e.g lamination, which some books refer to as larding, and why different types of butter affect lamina [...]

    13. M

      For the most part I knew the science behind each concept what with being a loyal Good Eats fan. But it's always nice to see something from a different perspective. The science aspect is very accessible. The experiments are not too rigorous but do get the point across that they generally know what they are doing. The recipes are all great. Everyone I've made so far has been a real winner. (Except the meringue cookies but that's likely user error). Each recipe is followed by why it works and the s [...]

    14. Katherine

      This cookbook was given to us as a gift. I am a home cook and my girls and I love science. The lay out of this book is a lot like all of the Cooks Illustrated/America's Test Kitchen books. The recipes are easy to read, they don't all have pictures which I do prefer with cook books. The pictures it does include are mostly grey scale.There are sections that explain the science behind food reactions, how food cooks, and why it's more efficient to cook certain items one way and not another way. Ther [...]

    15. Melissa Toman

      I have to make a lot of substitutions in recipes due to food allergies. This book is great because I can learn the functional purpose of each ingredient and that helps me determine what the best sub would be. Also, I appreciate knowing what steps are critical and why (including photos of what happens if a step is done incorrectly.

    16. Leslie

      This book has so much useful information! As a scientist (biologist) I feel an almost irresistible urge to repeat all their experiment. My plan is to read/cook my way through all their 50 cooking concepts.

    17. Science For The People

      Featured on Science for the People show #232 on September 27, 2013, during an interview with author Guy Crosby. scienceforthepeople/epi

    18. K. East

      Actually, it probably isn't accurate to say I've read this, which suggests cover-to-cover, as it is primarily a reference book for the analytical cook who wants to discover the science behind the art of cooking a great meal. If you have subscribed to the Cook's Illustrated magazine or seen the shows on PBS, then you know this group loves to investigate -- and then explain -- how food cooks and why some techniques/foods/gadgets work better than others. I don't always agree with their 'science' bu [...]

    19. Holly Weiss

      Must-Have Cookbook/EncyclopediaReading the title may make the buyer beware. Is this a cookbook or a science lecture? Cooks, relax! In addition to explaining why a recipe works, the book is chock full of delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes. As a former subscriber to Cook’s Magazine, and avid cook, I have made and can attest to the quality of many recipes in this book. The cover of this new cookbook says it all. Four hundred recipes are “Engineered for Perfection.” In addition to the tested a [...]

    20. Jaleco

      THE REVOLUTIONARY BOOK THATBRINGS SCIENCE TO THE STOVEGreat cooks seem to operate on intuition. Watch one at work and you might think he or she must have a sixth sense that switches on in the kitchen. But great cooks aren t psychic. They simply understand the fundamental principles of cooking the unspoken rules that guide their every move in the kitchen. What s behind these principles? Science.At America s Test Kitchen, we know something about that. The team at Cook s Illustrated has spent the p [...]

    21. Denise

      Currently waiting for my banana bread to finish baking, and the smell is driving me absolutely bonkers. I've pitted my favorite recipe against the recommendation in the book to see which I like better. My bread isn't that much different from the GC book. Instead of vanilla, I typically add a tsp. of pumpkin spice and in the past I've used salted butter (based on what the book said on salt in butter, def. going salt free from now on). Also, I hadn't thought to put banana slices directly on top of [...]

    22. Virginia Campbell

      Cook's Illustrated takes a new approach to food and the art of cooking, examining not just the ingredients and the preparation methods for recipes, but exploring and highlighting why recipes work the way they do. The delicious results of this landmark twenty-year study are to be found in "Cook's Illustrated: The Science of Good Cooking". Thousands of tests resulted in 50 Simple Concepts to ensure success and enjoyment from the time spent in the kitchen. Whether you are a seasoned cook, a fanatic [...]

    23. Jennifer

      I've had this book for a few years and have dipped into it off and on - in a quest this spring to clean up my currently-reading stack I brought it out and started reading, which got me inspired to get in the kitchen and cook!I tend to think of myself as someone who follows recipes rather than improvising but as I discovered with a different Cook's Illustrated book, I definitely do some tweaking here and there with recipes. The great thing about this cookbook is that because it explains the diffe [...]

    24. Melanie

      Okay, I have not read every word of this cookbook (yet), but it has already taught me a ton of useful cooking techniques. I make the Almost No-Knead Bread recipe every week, and it is Almost Idiot-Proof.

    25. Alex

      This is a must for science-prone thinkers with even the slightest interest in cooking--all the better if one is actually passionate about it. Making cause-and-effect sense of traditional cooking techniques definitely contributes to improving cooking in general.

    26. Azzia Lamberson

      This book is essentially a manual for your kitchen. Incredibly helpful for how to cook or bake your dishes to perfection and the science behind it to understand how each of the steps in the instructions contributes to a perfect dish.

    27. Bill

      Rather than just giving recipes, this book explains concepts that make the recipes work. It sounds a bit boring, but I was interested in the rationale and found explanations lively. If you want to go deeper than just getting something on the table to eat, you might enjoy this one.

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