At the Ruin of the World

At the Ruin of the World A D The Roman Empire is crumbling The Emperor is weak Countless Romans live under the rule of barbarian kings Politicians scheme and ambitious generals vie for power Then from the depths of German

  • Title: At the Ruin of the World
  • Author: John Henry Clay
  • ISBN: 9781444761368
  • Page: 343
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A.D 448 The Roman Empire is crumbling.The Emperor is weak Countless Romans live under the rule of barbarian kings Politicians scheme and ambitious generals vie for power.Then from the depths of Germany arises an even darker threat Attila, King of the Huns, gathering his hordes and determined to crush Rome once and for all.In a time of danger and deception, where everyA.D 448 The Roman Empire is crumbling.The Emperor is weak Countless Romans live under the rule of barbarian kings Politicians scheme and ambitious generals vie for power.Then from the depths of Germany arises an even darker threat Attila, King of the Huns, gathering his hordes and determined to crush Rome once and for all.In a time of danger and deception, where every smile conceals betrayal and every sleeve a dagger, three young people hold onto the dream that Rome can be made great once But as their fates collide, they find themselves forced to survive in a world deadly than any of them could ever have imagined.What can they possibly do to save the Empire, or themselves, from destruction

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      Published :2018-04-19T03:35:43+00:00

    One thought on “At the Ruin of the World

    1. Jane

      A disappointment and not quite what I thought it would be: continuation of the author's previous book, The Lion and the Lamb . This novel was set in southern Gaul, a century or so after the other took place. This one was a look into the meltdown of the Western Roman Empire through the stories of two families: one, a patrician brother and sister and the other, a young man whose family had fallen upon hard times and into poverty. Various barbarian tribes are controlling parts of Gaul; Rome is a sh [...]

    2. Kate

      The Lion and the Lamb was one of my very favourite novels of last year and John Henry Clay has done it again with At the Ruin of the World (what a great title). Firmly routed in history, this is a compelling and addictive account of the demise of Rome's Western Empire, focusing in particular on one family that was influential in the battlefield and in politics. An excellent, wonderfully-written novel.

    3. Charlotte K

      More History than FictionThis book had real potential. It is set in the Later Roman Empire between the years of 448 and 457 AD, and leads us faithfully through those uncertain times in the Western Empire: from the scourge of the Huns to the sack of Rome, through various barbarians rebellions and all the politics in between. The story is told via three point-of-view characters: brother and sister, Ecdicius and Attica, who are the offspring of a famous military leader (with all the privilege and e [...]

    4. Speesh

      It took a while before it dawned on me that this wasn't quite what I'd thought, hoped, it was. A continuation of the first - 'The Lion and The Lamb.' It is set in the same historical period, a bit later maybe and in southern France and Italy, rather than Britannia. Other than that, I’m struggling to see what he wanted to do with this. Of course, a look at the final phase(s) of the Roman Empire, but it really doesn’t come over enough. Doesn’t hit hard enough. There is a sense of the mental [...]

    5. Sarah

      It's such a pleasure to see a book set in the 450sAD; this is a fascinating period of history and one which deserves far more attention from novelists than it gets. Apart from a couple of slips (Arvandus's father would not be called Patroclus, he just would not; it's a name for a slave or freedman, not a dispossessed equestrian - unless you're implying that he sold himself into slavery to survive, which doesn't seem to be the case), John Henry Clay has done a fantastic job of recreating the era, [...]

    6. Brian

      The final years of the Western Roman Empire are a fascinating period: a world that has lasted for centuries suddenly begins to crumble as the landscape shifts in a kind of cultural earthquake. Out of a few biographical fragments sifted from the disintegrating record, John Henry Clay has built a compelling narrative full of complex, multi-faceted characters struggling to hold their place as all the assumptions on which they have come to depend are swept away.It is the story of Ecdicius, son of Av [...]

    7. Linda Humberstone

      This is a well written book with some interesting historical facts but it is not an epic as one is lead to believe from the cover. There is no building up of the story, it just ambles along nicely with just an exciting narrative of one battle and has rather a disappointing conclusion.

    8. Chris F

      This book had real potential but for me never fully reached it. The battle scenes didn't quite convince me that they were equal to events that changed history that they sort to portray.

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